Why The FAA And IATA Are Worried About 5G Affecting Planes

The newest generation of mobile connectivity, 5G, is undergoing a change. On December 5th, new services will begin rolling out in the C-band spectrum, using frequencies just a couple of hundred megahertz below the protected aeronautical spectrum. Both IATA and the FAA have raised concerns that this could interfere with sensitive equipment such as the radio altimeter, with the FAA even issuing a Special Airworthiness Bulletin earlier this week.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/faa-iata-5g-affecting-planes/

Well this certainly is interesting. Especially because it has the ability to potentially interfere with the glide slope, which in certain ILS’s let’s pilots land in zero visibility conditions. If 5G actually does interfere with the ILS system, it has the potential to cause some crashes or other incidents.

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If that is the case I absolutely agree that it is a major safety threat to aviation. We’d better stick to 4G for now to avoid crashes.

and that’s the thing, right now we don’t really know for sure, so IF it does, it should be banned

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This seems like an interesting problem. I wouldn’t personally be surprised if it does cause problems.

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a pair of airworthiness directives in an attempt to mitigate concerns about the impact of 5G mobile data signals on aircraft. Specifically, there are fears that interference from such networks may cause aircraft’s altimeters to become unreliable. This could limit aircraft operations in certain conditions.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/faa-5g-affects-planes/

The US air industry has won a two-week reprieve from the rollout of 5G services across the United States. Major companies AT&T and Verizon agreed to a two-week delay to continue to work on a way to keep air operations safe while rolling out the technology. For the last few weeks, the airlines and labor groups have been engaged in a tense standoff against AT&T and Verizon over the rollout of 5G. As soon as earlier today, it appeared a resolution would not come in time to stop the rollout on Wednesday.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/us-5g-delayed/
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well, this seems to be good news. Maybe I mean, we still need to see how much it interferes, if it all.

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The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) yesterday shared a list of airports that will have buffer zones when communication companies switch on the controversial new 5G C-band service on January 19th. The move follows the rise of notable concerns from authorities about the technology’s impact on aviation safety.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/faa-50-airports-5g/

The Federal Aviation Administrator (FAA) released hundreds of NOTAMs on Wednesday ahead of the mid-January rollout of C-band 5G cellular networks in the United States. Included in the NOTAMs was a ban on auto-landings and radio-altimeter-based automated flight manoeuvres at 100 airports across the US.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/us-airport-autoland-5g/

more news on 5G and aviation

The fact is says “hundreds of NOTAMS” suggests they don’t trust it very much.

Nearly half of all commercial aircraft based in the United States have received Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) clearance to conduct low-visibility landings at US airports ahead of the controversial C-band 5G rollout this week.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/faa-clears-planes-5g-rollout/

this is a really good update for half of the commercial aircraft based in the U.S that’s for sure. I can only imagine the number goes up.

Yea for sure! Interested to see what will happen when it’s fully rolled out. (any complications, more severe than expected)…?

Major airlines Emirates, JAL, and ANA, Have all announced they would be canceling some flights to the US as a result of potential 5G interference with radio altimeters onboard aircraft. The cancellations impact flights operated by Boeing 777 aircraft. As the US aviation industry and regulators still wrestle over 5G with telecom providers AT&T and Verizon over how to roll out the technology safely without impacting flights, foreign airlines have decided to play it cautiously and cancel flights as they wait and see what the 5G rollout on January 19th brings.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/emirates-jal-ana-us-cuts-5g/

Telcos Verizon and AT&T have once again delayed deploying the 5G technology near airports after a massive backlash from US airlines. On Tuesday, for the third time, both telcos agreed to hold off rolling out 5G within two miles of airports.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/5g-roll-out-delayed/

The concerns surrounding the deployment of 5G services in the US have started affecting flights from around the world. Air India, the only Indian airline to fly to the US, has canceled most of its US flights on January 19th. The India-US network is extremely popular, and the cancellation is expected to affect thousands of passengers.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/air-india-5g-cancelations/

The topic of 5G data, and its impact on airline operations, has recently become a key talking point in the world of commercial aviation. This is despite it being operational for several years, with 2019 marking a key year for wider usage on a worldwide scale. So why is it only now that its use is proving problematic for the airline industry? Let’s take a look.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://simpleflying.com/5g-aviation-problem-2022/

lots of updates, lots of not so great news when it comes to air travel in the U.S.

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